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SHOULD I SUE?
Shirley Sostre, Esq.

Who among us has not, at some point in time, felt harmed by the actions of another person? Who has not felt an affront to their sense of integrity and honor? Especially in today###s competitive business world, we often feel we are the victims of unethical play by others. But when should we consider legal action as an appropriate response to such injuries? The answer is never clear.

If you feel you have been seriously injured and feel the need to investigate your options, you should consult an attorney. A brief consultation may be worth the money you pay for it if. For example, you may consult an attorney who tells you that while you may feel injured, the other party may not have broken any laws or engaged in any behavior that the law feels the need to address. This is often the case when people are abruptly fired from their jobs. They feel hurt, they may suffer real financial distress and they may have their reputations tarnished. Nevertheless, many times there is no legal remedy available for this type of injury. Knowing that may be painful, but may answer any questions you may be asking yourself about what you should do.

On the other hand, you may consult with an attorney who can tell you what your rights are. One of those rights may be to take legal action. Often the only other remedy is to forget about it and move on with your life. How should you make that choice?

  1. Make sure you find an attorney you trust. Get referrals from friends and call several different lawyers to get a feel for their style###s. If possible, find a lawyer that has a lot of experience in the area of law you are examining. Make sure you reach a level of comfort that the attorney you select is not going to pressure you to sue just so that she or he can collect a nice fee.
  2. Talk to your attorney about the financial commitments you can expect to make if you decide to sue. Find out how long you can expect to be in court, and what kinds of expenses you should expect to have to pay. Talk with your family about it and think about whether it is a commitment you can follow through with for the long haul.
  3. Talk to your attorney about the emotional aspects of trial. Ask whether private personal matters may need to be aired in a public way. Ask if you will be examined harshly by the other party###s lawyers at trial. Discuss any potentially embarrassing or damaging information ahead of time, so that you know what you can expect. Then, as with the financial commitment, discuss these issues with your family and make sure the support system you need is in place long before you go to court.
  4. Spend a lot of time examining the down-side. Think about the aggravation and frustration involved, and the expenditure of funds. Think about the effects a court case may have on your business or on your relationships. Think about what could happen if you don###t win the case, and whether you might be required to pay the other party###s legal expenses if you lose.
  5. Ask yourself what you are really looking for. Examine carefully whether you can get what you are looking for by going to trial. Ask yourself if there is any other way to accomplish what you are looking for without having to go to court. Be honest with yourself about these things because ultimately they will affect your sense of satisfaction regardless of whether you win or lose the case.
  6. Ask yourself what you are really looking for. Examine carefully whether you can get what you are looking for by going to trial. Ask yourself if there is any other way to accomplish what you are looking for without having to go to court. Be honest with yourself about these things because ultimately they will affect your sense of satisfaction regardless of whether you win or lose the case.
  7. Spend a lot of time examining the down-side. Think about the aggravation and frustration involved, and the expenditure of funds. Think about the effects a court case may have on your business or on your relationships. Think about what could happen if you don###t win the case, and whether you might be required to pay the other party###s legal expenses if you lose.
  8. Ask yourself what you are really looking for. Examine carefully whether you can get what you are looking for by going to trial. Ask yourself if there is any other way to accomplish what you are looking for without having to go to court. Be honest with yourself about these things because ultimately they will affect your sense of satisfaction regardless of whether you win or lose the case.
  9. Ask yourself what you are really looking for. Examine carefully whether you can get what you are looking for by going to trial. Ask yourself if there is any other way to accomplish what you are looking for without having to go to court. Be honest with yourself about these things because ultimately they will affect your sense of satisfaction regardless of whether you win or lose the case.
  10. Talk to your attorney about the emotional aspects of trial. Ask whether private personal matters may need to be aired in a public way. Ask if you will be examined harshly by the other party###s lawyers at trial. Discuss any potentially embarrassing or damaging information ahead of time, so that you know what you can expect. Then, as with the financial commitment, discuss these issues with your family and make sure the support system you need is in place long before you go to court.
  11. Spend a lot of time examining the down-side. Think about the aggravation and frustration involved, and the expenditure of funds. Think about the effects a court case may have on your business or on your relationships. Think about what could happen if you don###t win the case, and whether you might be required to pay the other party###s legal expenses if you lose.
  12. Ask yourself what you are really looking for. Examine carefully whether you can get what you are looking for by going to trial. Ask yourself if there is any other way to accomplish what you are looking for without having to go to court. Be honest with yourself about these things because ultimately they will affect your sense of satisfaction regardless of whether you win or lose the case.
  13. Ask yourself what you are really looking for. Examine carefully whether you can get what you are looking for by going to trial. Ask yourself if there is any other way to accomplish what you are looking for without having to go to court. Be honest with yourself about these things because ultimately they will affect your sense of satisfaction regardless of whether you win or lose the case.
  14. Spend a lot of time examining the down-side. Think about the aggravation and frustration involved, and the expenditure of funds. Think about the effects a court case may have on your business or on your relationships. Think about what could happen if you don###t win the case, and whether you might be required to pay the other party###s legal expenses if you lose.
  15. Ask yourself what you are really looking for. Examine carefully whether you can get what you are looking for by going to trial. Ask yourself if there is any other way to accomplish what you are looking for without having to go to court. Be honest with yourself about these things because ultimately they will affect your sense of satisfaction regardless of whether you win or lose the case.
  16. Ask yourself what you are really looking for. Examine carefully whether you can get what you are looking for by going to trial. Ask yourself if there is any other way to accomplish what you are looking for without having to go to court. Be honest with yourself about these things because ultimately they will affect your sense of satisfaction regardless of whether you win or lose the case.
  17. Talk to your attorney about the financial commitments you can expect to make if you decide to sue. Find out how long you can expect to be in court, and what kinds of expenses you should expect to have to pay. Talk with your family about it and think about whether it is a commitment you can follow through with for the long haul.
  18. Talk to your attorney about the emotional aspects of trial. Ask whether private personal matters may need to be aired in a